Hosting services in .NET Core console application

Building .NET Core console applications with IHost and HostBuild to take advantage of IHostedService, graceful shutdown, dependency injection, logging, configuration and more.

When building services for data processing you do not always need a user interface. An IHost is very capable of hosting such an application in a console application as headless service. The IHost does give you a number of advantages like graceful shut down, dependency injection, logging, and configuration. When running long processing tasks in Docker containers, graceful shut down helps you to keep the state of your application consistent. This post explains how making use of the generic IHost in .NET Core for headless services.

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HttpClient and HttpClientFactory in ASP.NET Core

Use the new HttpClientFactory to create HttpClient objects in ASP.NET Core. Learn how to create Named or Typed HttpClient instances.

With .NET Core 2.1 the HttpClientFactory is introduced. The HttpClientFactory is a factory class which helps with managing HttpClient instances. Managing your own HttpClient correctly was not so easy. The HttpClientFactory gives you a number of options for easy management of your HttpClient instances. In this post I’ll explain how to use the HttpClientFactory in your ASP.NET Core application.

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Access XML SOAP services in .NET Core and client certificates (SSL)

WCF meets .NET Core

Only a few years back Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) was the way to do communication on the Microsoft platform based on SOAP protocol. Now a days new services are mostly build on top of Representational State Transfer (REST) Services. Sometimes you have to access a ‘legacy’ SOAP services for .NET Core. .NET Core has limited WCF support. In this blog post I’ll explain how to consume SOAP services form .NET Core.
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Run scheduled background tasks in ASP.NET Core

In the previous blog post called background tasks with ASP.NET Core using the IHostedService Peter described how to use the IHostedInterface for background tasks. In this post, we continue on this subject and add some pointers on how to perform scheduled background tasks.

In many software projects, there are repetitive tasks; some do just repeat every x seconds after the last instance is finished but you might also have to run a task on a schedule like every 10 minutes. When building repeating or scheduled tasks there are many options on how to approach the scheduling and this approach can be influenced by a number of technical choices.

Building the scheduling yourself is an option when you do not want to add extra dependencies to your project, have full control or just want an extra technical challenge. An out of the box solution you can a look at Hangfire, Quartz.net, or an external service that does an http call every x seconds to trigger the task (something like Pingdom).

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Upgrade ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core 2.0 to 2.1

In the past weeks we have upgraded our ASP.NET Core 2.0 project to 2.1. The main reason for the upgrade is using the latest signalr capabilities and hosted services. The issues we had are related to the features we use. In our case the upgrade encountered some minor issues. In this blog post I’ll show what we had to change and give some tips on how to upgrade.

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Let your build work for you, shorten the feedback loop

Tips and tricks Inline Powershell task VSTS, combine webhooks, rest api calls to get more out of your VSTS/TFS build and release pipelines

Maximize how you use your VSTS build and release pipeline with Inline Powershell tasks. In this blog series ‘Tips and Tricks for Inline Powershell’, I will show simple samples on how to get more out of your pipelines. This blog post: Let your build work for you Continue reading “Let your build work for you, shorten the feedback loop”

VSTS Rest API from Inline Powershell

Tips and tricks Inline Powershell task VSTS, call the VSTS/TFS Rest APIs from Powershell

Maximize how you use your VSTS build and release pipeline with Inline Powershell tasks. In this blog series ‘Tips and Tricks for Inline Powershell’, I will show simple samples on how to get more out of your pipelines. This blog post: VSTS Rest API Continue reading “VSTS Rest API from Inline Powershell”